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species_black_tail_marmosets.jpg

Black-tailed marmoset

Mico melanurus

The Black-tailed marmoset can be clearly distinguished from other similar looking species as it has a distinct yellowish stripe that extends down its thigh.

Interesting fact: Tamarins and marmosets are unusual amongst primates as they have squirrel-like nails that resemble claws.

Find out more...

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Habitat & threats

Rain forest in Brazil and Paraguay where the conditions are wet and humid, through to a varied habitat in Bolivia where they have also been observed in dry, deciduous forests. The adaptability of this species to thrive in a varied habitat means that there is a stable population with no significant threats. Natural predators are mainly snakes and birds of prey.

This marmoset feeds predominately on plant exudates such as gum and tree sap as well as fruit and nectar but they also hunt for a variety of small animal prey including frogs, lizards, spiders and insects. Their ability to adapt to varied habitat and a varied diet contributes to the success and stability of this species.

 

Diet

This marmoset feeds predominately on plant exudates such as gum and tree sap as well as fruit and nectar but they also hunt for a variety of small animal prey including frogs, lizards, spiders and insects. Their ability to adapt to varied habitat and a varied diet contributes to the success and stability of this species.

 

Breeding and social dynamics

They live in family groups of up to 15 animals. Only one female will breed in the group. Following a gestation of about 145 days she will normally give birth to twins. As with all marmosets, older siblings and the male will take turns in baby-sitting.